Yesterday afternoon and evening, for me, went with a strange sense of anticlimax.

Nearly everything went according to plan!

Amazing and somewhat off-putting.  This is not how things normally go for a ‘Big Switch On’ on a Wardian project.

Things just worked.  Nothing blew up, there were no tell-tale plumes of blue smoke; there were no bad smells of burning silicon; there were no muffled ‘crumps‘ as something big and expensive died.

So, as the title today suggests, I’m sat here, with a slightly dazed feeling.

How could it all have gone so well?!

Yesterday, I got back from that meeting much later than planned -I’d been kept waiting for over an hour, and there were still a couple of soldering jobs to finish -I had to re-solder the 9-pin serial connector, the power switch and the programming switch so that it would all fit in the box.

Diane texted me saying she’d be round imminently, leaving me barely half an hour to finish it all off.

This was how a project ought to go!

But by the time she’d arrived, miraculously, I’d just about done.  While she made herself a cup of tea, I finished it off, screwed the lid down and switched it on.

Flashing lights, and briefly getting on the bike and pedaling to confirm the PWM was working, yes, it was.

Strange!

Diane took the box, the bike holder and the lights over to The Plots in her car while I cycled over.  This was fun, as the back tire is a ‘slick’ (…to reduce noise when pedaling…), and luckily the roads were quite dry.  Had there been any rain in the air, then I’d have been kissing the backside of a bus as the back tried to catch up with the front when I touched the rear brakes.

Claps and cheers as I arrived (…Thanks, Diane!..), and there were quite a few ‘Junior Plotters’ about.  I’d come down on my bike, was there any chance that the we were having a demonstration of the power project?  Yes, there was.

Initial shouts and cries of disbelief were quickly quelled as I explained that Diane had all the bits in her car.

So myself, Sara, John and Gary put up the three gazebos in an ‘L’ shape, then tie-wrapped the legs together where they met.  Junior Plotters were bouncing around, obviously keen for me to set up the bike, so I eventually gave in and set it up.

Then I had an idea.  The recent light frosts have meant that the nasturtiums on the mound have now mostly died back, but they’ve left their seeds.  You may recall that I pickled a jar’s-worth a few weeks ago, and I was keen to get some more for another pickling session.

So, I told the Plot Kids that I’d only let the taller ones have a go on the bike if they picked me enough nasturtium seeds.  Well, they set off as if possessed, eager to bring me as many of them as possible.  Kyle in particular was very anxious to ‘have a go’.

Is this enough?

Is this enough?

Here he is with the bowl.

After a cursory scout round myself; “You missed this one!  And this!”, I finally, ‘reluctantly’ gave in, and we all went over to the bike.

I switched it on, and yes, as Kyle had requested, they could see the blue LEDs!

I got on, started pedaling, and more lights came on -to show that the PWM was working and that charge was being put back in the battery.

The ‘Grown-Ups’ heard all the commotion and came over, and quite soon, quite a crowd had gathered.

Kyle cycling to keep the lights on.

Kyle cycling to keep the lights on.

We were also celebrating Chloe’s birthday, and various cakes and pastries had been brought to share, so we set them up under one of the gazebos, and here you can see the interest is pretty evenly split between the food on the table and the bike.

In the meantime, nearly everybody ‘had a go’, and here’s Gary doing his ten minutes-worth.

Go for it Gary!

Go for it Gary!

John and I had positioned the lights such that three of them were on the pillar where all three gazebos me in the elbow on the ‘L’ shape with the fourth light shining directly down on the bike itself.  Well, it was centre stage!

Also to note was that there were a couple of comments about the height of the saddle, and Diane in particular found it quite painful to be so low because she has problems with her left hip.  So, before the next ‘outing’, a quick-release adjuster for the height adjuster will be bought.

Another comment was the fact that the bike was positioned so it was ‘pointing uphill’ on the driveway.  This was to counteract the fact that the back wheel is slightly raised by the frame in which it sits, so it ended up being fairly level to ride, rather than feeling like you’re going downhill all the time.

All too soon it was going dark.

Now, on a ‘normal’ Plot Day -as much as one ever can be normal, we always treat the dusk with a ‘groan’ for it means that very soon we have to stop work, but yesterday, we couldn’t wait!

People had started to drift off, but there were just enough of us left to put down the gazebos and stow the equipment away ready for its first ‘official’ outing on Saturday for Halloween.

Control box and cables, lit as it goes dark.

Control box and cables, lit as it goes dark.

Here, you can see a final shot before we packed it all up with the plain black control box, surrounded by the lighting cables, bathed by the light of some of the spotlights.

A suggestion was made that for a future version.  I should make the top out of clear perspex so interested people could look inside.

Of course, people are ‘spoiled’ by ‘Star Trek’  and other sci-fi where there are lights behind all the panels, so if I do make a clear lid, I’ll have to make sure there are plenty of flashing tell-tales.

Of course, people will then ask what each LED represents, so I’ll have to get creative with the various functions inside.  Words like ‘plasma flow injectors’ and ‘wave-guides’ will have to be thought up.  ‘Manifold’ will have to come into is somewhere.

Oh, and there’ll be blue LEDs.

I promise.

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